Gill


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Gill was an English measure of volume and was used as a dry and liquid measure. With the exception of beer in the British colonies and the USA, the measure was about 6 35 cubic inches (Prussian) or 110 quart (Prussian). A gill is between 0.11 and 0.14 liters .

In British bars, the liquor used to be sold in quantities of 16 gill, which corresponds to around 2.3 cl . Today in Great Britain 2.5 or 3.5 cl are common.

  • Unit symbols: Imp. Gi., Imp. Gi., US liquid gi., US liquid gi., US. liq. gi.
  • The dimensional chain is: 1 gallon = 4 quart = 8 pint = 16 cup = 32 gill
  • 1 gill = 14 pint = 132 gallon
  • 1 imp. Gi. = 5 imp. Fl. Oz = 40 imp. Fl. Dr. = 2400 pulses min. = 284.130.62532.774.128 inch³ ≈ 8.669 inch³
    1 Imp. Gi. = 142.065 312 500 cm³0.142 liters
  • 1 US. liq. gi. = 4 US. fl.oz = 32 US. fl. dr. = 1920 US. min. = 7.21875 cubic inch = 118.294 118,250 cm³0.118 liters
  • 1 imp. Gi. = 568.261.250473.176.473 US. liq. gi. ≈ 1.20095 US. liq. gal.

See also

literature

  • F. Frank: Coins, measures and weights of all countries in the world traced back to German. Schulbuchverlag, Langensalza 1856, p. 49

Individual evidence

  1. Karl von Scherzer: Statistical-commercial results of a trip around the world, undertaken on board the Austrian frigate Novara in the years 1857-1859. FA Brockhaus, Leipzig / Vienna 1867, p. 741