ORGAN² / ASLSP

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ORGAN² / ASLSP (often also written Organ2 / ASLSP ) is a piece of music for organ by John Cage from 1987. The abbreviation ASLSP stands for as slow as possible and is the instruction to play the eight-page score as slowly as possible . At the world premiere in 1989 in Metz , organist Gerd Zacher played the organ piece in a length of 29 minutes. More recent CD recordings have been made by Gary Verkade , Hans-Ola Ericsson , Christoph Bossert and Dominik Susteck .

Since 2001 it has been performed in the Sankt Burchardi Church in Halberstadt as the slowest and longest-lasting organ piece in the world with a total length of 639 years.

Emergence

John Cage originally composed the piece under the title ASLSP in 1985 for piano using a random program on the computer. It was commissioned and a competition piece for The University of Maryland Piano Festival and Competition , later renamed the William Kapell International Piano Competition , and premiered on July 14, 1985 in College Park , Maryland . In the original, the composer also used the term As Slow (ly) and Soft (ly) as Possible , referring to the quote “Soft morning city. Lsp! ”From the novel Finnegans Wake by James Joyce . The work is divided into eight equally long parts. Cage rewrote it for organ in 1987 for organist Gerd Zacher .

Performance in Halberstadt

Saint Burchardi Church
The organ

prehistory

At an organ symposium in Trossingen in 1997 , the idea arose to take the phrase as slow as possible even more literally than at the first performance. The choice for the performance location fell on Halberstadt , since one of the oldest documented organs of modern times was built in Halberstadt Cathedral in 1361. The organizers call the Gothic organ of Halberstadt Cathedral the "first large organ in the world". However, since the cathedral is used as a place of worship, the then unused Sankt Burchardi Church in the former monastery of Sankt Burchardi was used .

The eight-page score was extrapolated to the intended playing time of 639 years for the performance . This period resulted from the difference between the installation of the old (not preserved) cathedral organ from 1361 in the Halberstadt Cathedral and the originally planned start of performance in 2000. The range thus spans from 1361 through 2000 to the year 2639. The actual performance of the work However, due to delays, it could not begin until September 5, 2001 and should therefore not end until 2640.

organ

The Marburg organ builder Gerald Woehl was involved in the project during the planning phase . The organ in the Sankt-Burchardi-Kirche was built especially for the performance of the piece by the Kevelaer organ builder Romanus F. Seifert & Son with the support of the Orgelbau Reinhard Hüfken company from Halberstadt. It stands in the right transept of the church, while the bellows is in the left transept. There are also old choir stalls . Since the organ is in continuous operation, it was covered by an acrylic glass case in order to reduce its own noise (during the breaks). An emergency power generator is connected to prevent the piece from being interrupted in the event of a power failure . Several organ pipes can be placed in the organ . With the so-called tone changes, these are exchanged according to the course of the score.

performance

The performance of the piece began on September 5, 2001. Since it began with a break of one and a half years, the first organ sound was heard on February 5, 2003.

The tone changes are generally well received by the public, so that many visitors come at these times. The last change of tone took place on October 5, 2013. The next change of tone will take place on September 5, 2020, after seven years.

The tone change from January 5, 2006 g sharp ″ / e / e ′ → g sharp ″ / e / e ′ / a ′ / c ″ / f sharp ″ is available as audio file i (the actual tone change from 8 min 30 s).Speaker Icon.svg  

Dates of the tone change of the first part

The bellows
Memorial plaques on the wall of the church
John Cage ORGAN² / ASLSP (639 years, part 1)
pulse action volume date
Impulse 1: P: September 5, 2001
Impulse 2: K: g sharp ′, h ′, g sharp ″ February 5, 2003 518 d
Impulse 3: K: e, e ′ July 5, 2004 516 d
Impulse 4: P: g sharp ′, h ′ July 5, 2005 365 d
Impulse 5: K: a ′, c ″, f sharp ″ January 5, 2006 184 d
Impulse 6: P: e, e ′ May 5, 2006 120 d
Impulse 7: K: c ′, as ′ July 5, 2008 792 d
Impulse 8: P: c ′ November 5, 2008 123 d
Impulse 9: K: d ′, e ″ February 5, 2009 92 d
Impulse 10: P: e ″ 5th July 2010 515 d
Impulse 11: P: d ′, g sharp ″ February 5, 2011 215 d
Impulse 12: K / P: c ′ (16 ′), des ′ (16 ′), as ′ August 5, 2011 181 d
Impulse 13: P: a ′, c ″, f sharp ″ 5th July 2012 335 d
Impulse 14: K: dis ′, ais ′, e ″ 5th October 2013 457 d
Impulse 15: K: g sharp, e ′ 5th September 2020 2527 d
Impulse 16: P: g sharp February 5, 2022 518 d
Impulse 17: K: d ′ February 5, 2024 730 d
Impulse 18: K: a ′ August 5, 2026 912 d
Impulse 19: P: e ′ October 5, 2027 426 d
Impulse 20: K: G April 5, 2028 183 d
Impulse 21: P: d ′ August 5, 2028 122 d
Impulse 22: P: a ′ March 5, 2030 577 d
Impulse 23: P: dis ′, e ″ September 5, 2030 184 d
Pulse 24: P: G May 5, 2033 973 d
Impulse 25: K: H December 5, 2033 214 d
Impulse 26: K: f, d ′ August 5, 2034 243 d
Impulse 27: P: f, d ′ September 5, 2034 31 d
Impulse 28: P: H October 5, 2034 30 d
Impulse 29: K: of" June 5, 2035 243 d
Pulse 30: K / P: A (16 ′) of the ″ September 5, 2037 823 d
Impulse 31: K: as ′, as ″ March 5, 2038 181 d
Impulse 32: P: as ″ July 5, 2038 122 d
pulse action volume date
Impulse 33: P: as ′ May 5, 2039 304 d
Impulse 34: K: the' December 5, 2039 214 d
Impulse 35: P: the' April 5, 2040 122 d
Impulse 36: K: des, b January 5, 2041 275 d
Impulse 37: P: des, b March 5, 2042 424 d
Impulse 38: P: A (16 ′) November 5, 2043 610 d
Impulse 39: K: a, d ′ July 5, 2044 243 d
Pulse 40: K / P: e′ais ′ March 5, 2045 243 d
Impulse 41: K: h ′, c ″, ais ″ March 5, 2046 365 d
Pulse 42: P: c ′ (16 ′), h ′, c ″, ais ″ October 5, 2047 579 d
Impulse 43: K: c (16 ′) February 5, 2049 489 d
Impulse 44: K: dis ′, a ′ April 5, 2050 424 d
Impulse 45: P: a, d ′, e ′ February 5, 2051 306 d
Pulse 46: P: dis ′, a ′ November 5, 2051 273 d
Impulse 47: K: it, h May 5, 2053 547 d
Pulse 48: P: c (16 ′) November 5, 2054 549 d
Impulse 49: P: it, h July 5, 2056 608 d
Pulse 50: K: b ′ August 5, 2057 396 d
Impulse 51: K: A (16 ′) May 5, 2058 273 d
Pulse 52: P: A (16 ′) November 5, 2059 549 d
Impulse 53: K: ges ′, c ″, des ″ April 5, 2060 152 d
Pulse 54: P: ges ′, c ″, des ″ June 5, 2060 61 d
Impulse 55: K / P: e′b ′ November 5, 2060 153 d
Impulse 56: K: h ′, c ″, it ″, c ′ ″ February 5, 2061 92 d
Impulse 57: P: c ″, it ″, c ′ ″ April 5, 2061 59 d
Impulse 58: K / P: d′e ′ September 5, 2061 153 d
Impulse 59: K: a sharp, dis ′, f sharp ′ August 5, 2062 334 d
Impulse 60: P: a sharp, f sharp ′ February 5, 2064 549 d
Impulse 61: K / P: a, a′d # ′ January 5, 2067 1065 d
Impulse 62: P: d ′ June 5, 2067 151 d
Impulse 63: P: a, a ′ July 5, 2068 396 d
Impulse 64: P: des ′ (16 ′) March 5, 2071 973 d
Pulse 65: P: H' July 5, 2071 122 d
K = beginning of sound
P = end of sound (pause)

Memorial plaques

In the church, memorial plaques can be attached to a stainless steel band for each performance year. Every donor and every donor group who donate more than 1200 EUR can have a board assigned and provide a text. On the project website you can see which years are still available.

Web links

Commons : ORGAN² / ASLSP  - collection of images, videos and audio files

Individual evidence

  1. Official website of the John Cage Organ Foundation Halberstadt (last accessed on October 27, 2013), according to which the project sees itself as a promise for the future and can accordingly also be regarded as a long-term musical experiment .
  2. a b taz, Fatal Days of Halberstadt by J. Kühnemund on July 2, 2005 on the occasion of the fading away of the stroked h on July 5, 2005, accessed on October 27, 2013.
  3. Die Zeit, The Frozen Time by U. Stock on January 8, 2006, accessed on October 27, 2013.
  4. Jump up ↑ Die Zeit, Das Humm Gottes by U. Stock on August 5, 2011 for the upcoming ten-year anniversary, accessed on September 17, 2011.
  5. a b ASLSP. In: johncage.org.
  6. As slowly as possible, and that for centuries , Raoul Mörchen, in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, September 13, 2000, quoted in John Cage in Halberstadt - The problem of time in "As Slow As Possible," David Zintl April 5, 2005
  7. Project description on the official website of the John Cage Organ Foundation Halberstadt, accessed on June 3, 2017
  8. The sound changes . Website of the John Cage Organ Art Project, Halberstadt. Retrieved February 5, 2017
  9. Excerpt from the score 'Klangwechsel' on the official website of the John Cage Organ Foundation Halberstadt, accessed on October 27, 2013.
  10. Sound change at Cage performance in Halberstadt: The slowest organ concert in the world. Der Spiegel , October 5, 2013, accessed October 5, 2013 .