International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

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International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

ICTY emblem

United Nations flag

ICTY service building in The Hague
English name International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY)
French name Tribunal pénal international pour l'ex-Yougoslavie (TPIY)
Organization type Ad hoc criminal court
Seat of the organs NetherlandsNetherlands The Hague , Netherlands
Chair Judge Carmel A. Agius (President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia) MaltaMalta 
founding May 25, 1993
resolution December 31, 2017
Upper organization Security Council of the United Nations
United NationsU.N.
www.icty.org

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia ( French Tribunal pénal international pour l'ex-Yougoslavie , abbreviated TPIY ; English International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia , abbreviated ICTY ), colloquially often called the UN War Crimes Tribunal or Hague Tribunal , was an ad- hoc criminal Court based in the Netherlands the Hague .

He was Resolution 827 of the UN Security Council from 25. May 1993 created and was responsible for the prosecution of serious crimes in the 1991 Yugoslavia war were committed. The International Residual Mechanism for the ad hoc criminal courts has been functioning as the joint successor to the ICTY and the International Criminal Court for Rwanda since July 2012, and existed in parallel with the two ad hoc courts for the transitional period until 2014.

The former Swiss chief prosecutor Carla Del Ponte was replaced on January 1, 2008 by the Belgian Serge Brammertz .

Of the total of 161 accused, 84 were convicted. The last criminal case was concluded on November 29, 2017. As of December 31, 2017, the criminal court was officially closed.

Responsibilities

According to the statute, the criminal court had the following powers:

  • Factual: The Court has four categories of criminal offense: serious violations of the Geneva Conventions , violations of the laws or customs of war , genocide and crimes against humanity .
  • Personal: Jurisdiction includes only natural persons (not organizations or governments).
  • Spatial: crimes committed on the territory of the former Yugoslavia .
  • Temporal: Crimes committed since 1991.
  • Competitive: The Court of Justice takes precedence over national courts.

Trials could only be carried out against those present in person; the defendants could expect a maximum sentence of life imprisonment . The execution of sentences is carried out in one of the states that have agreed in treaties with the United Nations to accept convicts. The Court can also refer cases to competent national courts such as the Special War Crimes Chamber at the Belgrade District Court .

Organizational structure

The Tribunal consisted of the court administration, responsible for the United Nations Detention Facility designated detention center of the Court in the Hague district of Scheveningen , where the suspects are on remand, a prosecution and the chambers .

The prosecution was headed by an independently working chief prosecutor. This was appointed - on the proposal of the UN Secretary General  - by the UN Security Council. The current chief prosecutor is the Belgian Serge Brammertz , who has followed the Swiss Carla del Ponte . From 1997 to 1998 the Canadian Louise Arbor , before that the South African Richard Goldstone (1994–1996) held this post - the Venezuelan Escovar Salom, originally chosen as the first chief prosecutor, had ultimately canceled. The chief prosecutors from 1994 to 2003 were also chief prosecutors of the second UN tribunal, the International Criminal Court for Rwanda , until the restructuring of the criminal court in September 2003 .

The Court had 18 permanent judges, divided into three criminal chambers and one appeals chamber. 16 of the permanent judges are elected by the UN General Assembly from a list established by the UN Security Council. The other two permanent judges are appointed by the President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, in consultation with the President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, from among the judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

The permanent judges elected the President of the Criminal Court from among their ranks - most recently the Maltese Carmel A. Agius , who replaced the American Theodor Meron in November 2015 . Prior to this, this position was held by the Jamaican Patrick Robinson (2008–2011), the Italian Fausto Pocar (2005–2008), also Theodor Meron (2002–2005), the French Claude Jorda (1999–2002), the American Gabrielle Kirk McDonald (1997–1999) and the Italian Antonio Cassese (1993–1997).

Vice President had since November 2015, the Chinese Liu Daqun .

In addition to the permanent judges, another twelve so-called ad litem judges were available for temporary reinforcement for individual processes. The three criminal chambers negotiated in the first instance. They were each made up of three of the permanent judges elected by the UN General Assembly. The Appeals Chamber consisted of seven permanent judges, including the two judges appointed by the President of the International Court of Justice for Rwanda. The President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia acted as chairman of the Appeals Chamber. The seven judges of the Appeals Chamber also formed the Appeals Chamber for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

The budget of the Court of Justice was approved by the UN General Assembly. The court was also financed by donations from states or supranational organizations such as the European Commission . The ICTY provided information on the amount of the budget and the donors in its annual reports.

A total of 919 employees from 76 nations were employed. The budget was approximately 150 million US dollars per year.

Judges College (permanent judges)

  • MaltaMalta Carmel A. Agius, President
  • China People's RepublicPeople's Republic of China Liu Daqun, vice president
  • TogoTogo Koffi Kumelio Afande
  • FranceFrance Jean-Claude Antonetti
  • BelgiumBelgium Guy Delvoie
  • GermanyGermany Christoph Flügge
  • BahamasBahamas Burton Hall
  • PakistanPakistan Khalida Khan
  • Korea SouthSouth Korea O-Gon Kwon
  • United StatesUnited States Theodor Meron
  • South AfricaSouth Africa Bakone Justice Moloto
  • United KingdomUnited Kingdom Howard Morrison
  • SenegalSenegal Mandiaye Niang
  • NetherlandsNetherlands Alphons MM Orie
  • ItalyItaly Fausto Pocar

Former permanent judges: Georges Abi-Saab (Egypt), Mohamed Bennouna (Morocco), Iain Bonomy (United Kingdom), Antonio Cassese (Italy), Jules Deschênes (Canada), Amin El Abbassi El Mahdi (Egypt), Asoka de Zoysa Gunawardana (Sri Lanka), Mehmet Güney (Turkey), David Anthony Hunt (Australia), Saad Saood Jan (Pakistan), Claude Jorda (France), Adolphus Godwin Karibi-Whyte (Nigeria), Germain Le Foyer De Costil (France), Haopei Li (China), Richard George May (United Kingdom), Gabrielle Kirk McDonald (USA), Florence Ndepele Mwachande Mumba (Zambia), Rafael Nieto Navia (Colombia), Elizabeth Odio Benito (Costa Rica), Kevin Parker (Australia), Arlette Ramaroson (Madagascar), Patrick L. Robinson (Jamaica), Almiro Simões Rodrigues (Portugal), Fouad Abdel-Moneim Riad (Egypt), Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany), William Hussein Sekule (Tanzania), Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana), Rustam S. Sidhwa (Pakistan), Sir Ninian Stephen (Australia), Christine Van den Wyngaert (B elgien), Lal Chand Vohrah (Malaysia), Patricia M. Wald (USA), Wang Tieya (China), Bakhtiyar Tuzmukhamedov (Russia), Andresia Vaz (Senegal), Inés Mónica Weinberg de Roca (Argentina)

Ad litem judge

last:

Former ad litem judges: Carmen Maria Argibay (Argentina), Hans Henrik Brydensholt (Denmark), Maureen Harding Clark (Ireland), Justice Ali Nawaz Chowhan (Pakistan), Pedro David (Argentina), Fatoumata Dembélé Diarra (Mali), Albin Eser (Germany), Elizabeth Gwaunza (Zimbabwe), Mohammed El Habib Fassi Fihri (Morocco), Claude Hanoteau (France), Frederik Harhoff (Denmark), Frank Höpfel (Austria), Ivana Janu (Czech Republic), Tsvetana Kamenova (Bulgaria), Uldis Kinis (Latvia), Per-Johan Viktor Lindholm (Finland), Joaquín Martín Canivell (Spain), Janet M. Nosworthy (Jamaica), Prisca Matimba Nyambe (Zambia), Michèle Picard (France), Árpád Prandler (Hungary), Kimberly Prost (Canada), Vonimbolana Rasoazanany (Madagascar), Amarjeet Singh (Singapore), Ole Bjørn Støle (Norway), Albertus Swart (Netherlands), György Szénási (Hungary), Chikako Taya (Japan), Krister Thelin (Sweden), Stefan Trechsel (Switzerland), Volodymyr Vassylenko (Ukraine), Sharon Williams (Canada)

Three judges each led the main proceedings and then determine the verdict with a 2: 1 majority or unanimously without the help of lay judges or jury members. The Appeals Chamber decides with a simple majority. Some judges judge several proceedings at the same time and there are substitute judges on record.

Convicts and prosecutors could appeal once; in exceptional cases, if more recent investigation results raise significant doubts, another appeals chamber cancels an already legally binding appeal judgment. In the Duško Tadić case, after the final verdict of guilty, the indictment was expanded and retried, without this being viewed as an inadmissible double punishment. In the case of Haradinaj et al. After the final acquittal, there was a further charge because incriminating material had subsequently emerged.

Punish

The only permissible punishment was imprisonment , which could be imposed indefinitely. Both very long time sentences (45 years) and life sentences have already been pronounced. After the extradition and remand detention have been deducted, the remaining sentence will be served in the usual penal system of a contracting state with the ICTY.

The following countries imprison legally convicted persons: Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Denmark, Great Britain, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Italy, France, Spain; Other contracting states still without transfer: Poland, Slovakia, Ukraine, Albania, Portugal.

Accuse

scope

One of the detention cells (15 m²) in the tribunal's detention center

Since the criminal court was able to fully commence its activities in December 1994, judicially confirmed indictments have been published against 161 suspects, 133 of whom appeared - compulsorily or voluntarily - at the tribunal.

Since the arrest of Goran Hadžić on July 20, 2011, none of the accused has been on the run.

The charges were withdrawn in 36 cases: The charges against 20 people in the preliminary proceedings were discontinued due to a lack of incriminating material, 10 accused died before their extradition, 6 during the main proceedings.

In the legally valid judgments of the Criminal Court, there were 83 convictions and 19 acquittals up to November 2017; 13 defendants were extradited to other courts. By 2011, 20 defendants pleaded guilty on the essentials.

On September 13, 2011 there were 35 ongoing proceedings: 16 appeal proceedings, 17 first instance proceedings and 2 preliminary proceedings ( Goran Hadžić and Ratko Mladić ).

The cases of KLA commanders Haradinaj, Balaj and Brahimaj resumed in July 2010. On November 29, 2012, all three commanders were found not guilty.

accused

The trial of Slobodan Milošević , Yugoslavia and Serbia's former president, who died in custody in March 2006 shortly before the end of his trial, aroused particular interest . In recent legal history, he was the first incumbent head of state to be indicted in an international criminal court.

The accused were:

Surname nationality guilt
confession
Judgment in 1st instance *
(years imprisonment)
Appeal
judgment
Remarks
Rahim Ademi Kosovo Albanians not guilty delivered - acquitted in Croatia
Mehmed Alagic Bosniaks not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Zlatko Aleksovski Bosnian Croat not guilty 2.5 7th
Stipo Alilović Bosnian Croat - - - died before the trial began
Milan Babic Croatian Serb guilty 13 13
Mirko Babic Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Haradin Bala Kosovo Albanians guilty 13 13
Idriz Balaj Kosovo Albanians not guilty acquittal Repeal new charge
WAV * Balaj not guilty acquittal no calling
Nenad Banović Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Predrag Banović Bosnian Serb guilty 8th no calling
Ljubiša Beara Bosnian Serb not guilty lifelong lifelong
Vidoje Blagojevic Bosnian Serb not guilty 18th 15th
Tihomir Blaškić Bosnian Croat not guilty 45 9
Janko Bobetko Croatian - - - died before the trial began
Ljubomir Borovčanin Bosnian Serb not guilty 17th no calling
Goran Borovnica Serb - - - died before the trial began
Ljube Boškoski Macedonians not guilty acquittal acquittal
Lahi Brahimaj Kosovo Albanians not guilty 6th 6th new charge
WAV * Brahimaj not guilty acquittal no calling
Miroslav Bralo Bosnian Croat guilty 20th 20th
Radoslav Brđanin Bosnian Serb not guilty 32 30th
Mario Čerkez Bosnian Croat not guilty 15th 6th
Ivan Čermak Croatian not guilty acquittal acquittal
Ranko Češić Bosnian Serb guilty 18th no calling
Valentin Ćorić Bosnian Croat not guilty 16 16
Zejnil Delalić Bosniaks not guilty acquittal acquittal
Hazim Delic Bosniaks not guilty 18th 18th
Rasim Delic Bosniaks not guilty 3 no vocation (deceased)
Miroslav Deronjić Bosnian Serb guilty 10 no calling
Slavko Dokmanović Serb not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Vlastimir Đorđević Serb not guilty 27 18th
Damir Došen Bosnian Serb guilty 5 no calling
Simo Drljača Bosnian Serb - - - died before the trial began
Đorđe Đukić Bosnian Serb not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Dražen Erdemović Bosnian Croat guilty 10 5
Anto Furundžija Bosnian Croat not guilty 10 10
Dušan Fuštar Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 9 years imprisonment
Dragan Gagović Bosnian Serb - - - died before the trial began
Stanislav Galic Bosnian Serb not guilty 20th lifelong
Ante Gotovina Croatian not guilty 24 acquittal
Zdravko Govedarica Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
(?) Gruban - - - Charges withdrawn
Momčilo Gruban Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 7 years imprisonment
Milan Gvero Bosnian Serb not guilty 5 no vocation (deceased)
Goran Hadžić Croatian Serb not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Enver Hadžihasanović Bosniaks not guilty 5 3.5
Sefer Halilović Bosniaks not guilty acquittal acquittal
Ramush Haradinaj Kosovo Albanians not guilty acquittal Repeal new charge
WAV * Haradinaj not guilty acquittal no calling
Janko Janjić Bosnian Serb - - - died before the trial began
Nikica Janjić Bosnian Serb - - - died before the trial began
Gojko Janković Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - 34 years imprisonment in Bosnia
Goran Jelisić Bosnian Serb guilty 40 40
Dragan Jokic Bosnian Serb not guilty 9 9
Miodrag Jokic Serb guilty 7th 7th
Drago Josipović Bosnian Croat not guilty 15th 12th
Radovan Karadžić Bosnian Serb not guilty 40 lifelong
Marinko Katava Bosnian Croat - - - Charges withdrawn
Duško Knežević Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 31 years imprisonment
Dragan Kolundžija Bosnian Serb guilty 3 no calling
Dragan Kondić - - - Charges withdrawn
Dario Kordic Bosnian Croat not guilty 25th 25th
Milojica Kos not guilty 6th no calling
Predrag Kostic - - - Charges withdrawn
Radomir Kovač Bosnian Serb not guilty 20th 20th
Milan Kovačević Bosnian Serb not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Vladimir Kovačević Montenegr. Serb not guilty delivered - unable to stand trial in Serbia
Momčilo Krajišnik Bosnian Serb not guilty 27 20th
Milorad Krnojelac Bosnian Serb not guilty 7.5 15th
Radislav Krstić Bosnian Serb not guilty 46 35
Amir Kubura Bosniaks not guilty 2.5 2
Dragoljub Kunarac Bosnian Serb not guilty 28 28
Mirjan Kupreškić Bosnian Croat not guilty 8th acquittal
Vlatko Kupreškić Bosnian Croat not guilty 6th acquittal
Zoran Kupreškić Bosnian Croat not guilty 10 acquittal
Miroslav Kvočka Bosnian Serb not guilty 7th 7th
Goran Lajić - - - Charges withdrawn
Esad Landžo Bosniaks not guilty 15th 15th
Vladimir Lazarevic Serb not guilty 15th 14th
Fatmir Limaj Kosovo Albanians not guilty acquittal acquittal
Paško Ljubičić Bosnian Croat not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 10 years imprisonment
Milan Lukic Bosnian Serb not guilty lifelong lifelong
Sredoje Lukic Bosnian Serb not guilty 30th 27
Sreten Lukic Serb not guilty 22nd 20th
Zoran Marinić - - - Charges withdrawn
Mladen Markač Croatian not guilty 18th acquittal
Milan Martić Croatian Serb not guilty 35 35
Vinko Martinović Bosnian Croat not guilty 18th 18th
Željko Mejakić Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - 21 years imprisonment in Bosnia
Radivoje Miletić Bosnian Serb not guilty 19th 18th
Slobodan Miljković Serb - - - died before the trial began
Dragomir Milosevic Bosnian Serb not guilty 33 29
Slobodan Milosevic Serb not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Milan Milutinović Serb not guilty acquittal acquittal
Ratko Mladic Bosnian Serb not guilty lifelong constantly
Darko Mrđa Bosnian Serb guilty 17th no calling
Mile Mrkšić Croatian Serb not guilty 20th 20th
Zdravko Mucic Bosnian Croat not guilty 7th 9
Agim Murtezi Kosovo Albanians - - - Charges withdrawn
Isak Musliu Kosovo Albanians not guilty acquittal acquittal
Mladen Naletilić Bosnian Croat not guilty 20th 20th
Dragan Nikolić Bosnian Serb guilty 23 20th
Drago Nikolić Bosnian Serb not guilty 35 35
Momir Nikolić Bosnian Serb guilty 27 20th
Mirko Norac Croatian not guilty delivered - 6 years imprisonment in Croatia
Dragan Obrenović Bosnian Serb guilty 17th no calling
Dragoljub Ojdanić Serb not guilty 15th - Appeal withdrawn
Naser Oric Bosniaks not guilty 2 acquittal
Vinko Pandurević Bosnian Serb not guilty 13 13
Dragan Papic Bosnian Croat not guilty acquittal acquittal
Nedeljko Paspalj Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Nebojša Pavković Serb not guilty 22nd 22nd
Milan Pavlić Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Momčilo Perišić Serb not guilty 27 acquittal
Biljana Plavšić Bosnian Serbian guilty 11 no calling
Milivoj Petković Bosnian Croat not guilty 20th 20th
Milutin Popović Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Vujadin Popović Bosnian Serb not guilty lifelong lifelong
Slobodan Praljak Bosnian Croat not guilty 20th 20th Suicide during the 2017 verdict
Dragoljub Prcać Bosnian Serb not guilty 5 5
Draženko Predojević Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Jadranko Prlić Bosnian Croat not guilty 25th 25th
Berislav Pušić Bosnian Croat not guilty 10 10
Miroslav Radić Serb not guilty acquittal acquittal
Mlađo Radić Bosnian Serb not guilty 20th 20th
Ivica Rajić Bosnian Croat guilty 12th no calling
Mitar Rašević Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 8.5 years imprisonment
Željko Ražnatović "Arkan" Serb - - - murdered in Belgrade
Nikola Šainović Serb not guilty 22nd 18th
Ivan Šantić - - - Charges withdrawn
Vladimir Šantić Bosnian Croat not guilty 25th 18th
Dragomir Šaponja Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Željko Savić - - - Charges withdrawn
Vojislav Šešelj Serb not guilty acquittal 10 11 years in pre-trial detention until the first sentence was pronounced, not re-imprisoned after conviction on appeal, as the sentence was shorter than the pre-trial detention that had already been served
Duško Sikirica Bosnian Serb guilty 15th no calling
Franko Simatović Serb not guilty acquittal Repeal
Blagoje Simić Bosnian Serb not guilty 17th 15th
Milan Simic Serb guilty 5 no calling
Pero Skopljak Croatian - - - Charges withdrawn
Veselin Šljivančanin Montenegrins not guilty 5 17th reduced to 10 years
Milomir Stakić Bosnian Serb not guilty lifelong 40
Jovica Stanišić Serb not guilty acquittal Repeal
Mićo Stanišić Bosnian Serb not guilty 22nd constantly
Radovan Stanković Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 20 years imprisonment
Bruno Stojić Bosnian Croat not guilty 20th 20th
Vlajko Stojiljković Serb - - - died before the trial began
Pavle Strugar Montenegrins not guilty 8th 7.5
Duško Tadić Bosnian Serb not guilty 20th 20th subsequently further indictment,
further sentence of 25 years,
second appeal sentence : 20 years
Miroslav Tadić Bosnian Serb not guilty 8th no calling
Momir Talic Bosnian Serb not guilty - - Died before the trial ended
Johan Tarčulovski Macedonians not guilty 12th 12th
Nedjeljko Timarac Bosnian Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Stevan Todorović Bosnian Serb guilty 10 no calling
Savo Todović Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - in Bosnia 12.5 years imprisonment
Zdravko Tolimir Bosnian Serb not guilty lifelong lifelong died in custody
Milorad Trbić Bosnian Serb not guilty delivered - 30 years imprisonment in Bosnia
Mitar Vasiljevic Bosnian Serb not guilty 20th 15th
Zoran Vuković Bosnian Serb not guilty 12th 12th
Simo Zarić Bosnian Serb not guilty 6th no calling
Milan Zec Serb - - - Charges withdrawn
Dragan Zelenović Bosnian Serb guilty 15th 15th
Zoran Žigić Bosnian Serb not guilty 25th 25th
Stojan Župljanin Bosnian Serb not guilty 22nd constantly

Source:
*) The number indicates the length of imprisonment in years; “Ongoing” means ongoing proceedings without a judgment, WAV is the abbreviation for retrial proceedings after the judgment has been overturned.

If there is no appeal judgment, either the appeal was waived or it was rejected as unfounded because no serious misjudgment by the first instance was alleged or justified in the application.

completion

With the ceremonial opening of the international residual mechanism for the ad hoc criminal courts in July 2013, numerous staff for the press department, translations and archives will gradually move to this newly established tribunal. In the future, the residual mechanism will regulate releases from prison, easing of imprisonment, media work, etc. Hadžić died in 2016, Mladić was sentenced to life imprisonment on November 22, 2017, and the last convictions against Bosnian-Croatian defendants were confirmed on November 29, 2017. The ICTY will be closed at the end of 2017; Appointments are to be directed to the residual mechanism in the future. An information center with access to all audio files and over 2,000,000 documents was set up in Banja Luka and Sarajevo .

criticism

Kosta Čavoški , Serbian professor of international law, who is no longer allowed to enter Bosnia-Herzegovina because of alleged links to war criminals, criticized, among other things, that the tribunal was founded in violation of international law. It is based on a generous interpretation of Chapter VII of the UN Charter , which speaks of “special measures to maintain or restore world peace and security”. Defendants such as the former Serbian and Yugoslav President Slobodan Milošević were unconstitutionally kidnapped or extradited. This was also not properly medically treated. The legal scholar Konstantinos D. Magliveras follows this line of argument, complaining that the tribunal creates its own rules at will and is not subject to any independent control. Since the prosecutor is an organ of the tribunal, he has a dominant position in the proceedings. Statements by witnesses whose identities are kept secret by the court are admissible as evidence. It should also be criticized that convicted defendants were not given an opportunity to appeal. Norman Paech , a retired university professor and politician on the left , believes that the tribunal is being used for political purposes. It also said that the tribunal was only interested in crimes committed by perpetrators of former Yugoslav nationality, while references to war crimes by NATO member states were not investigated. After all, defendants of Serbian nationality would be disadvantaged compared to others: while many Muslim or Croatian defendants would get away with relatively low prison terms, defendants such as Biljana Plavšić were usually sentenced to long prison terms.

By contrast, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled in the Naletilic v. Croatia case on May 4, 2000 that the Yugoslavia Tribunal is an international court which, in view of the content of its statute and its procedural rules, offers all the necessary guarantees for a fair trial , including those of impartiality and independence (in view of the content of its Statute and Rules of Procedure, offers all the necessary guarantees including those of impartiality and independence) .

See also

literature

Web links

Commons : International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia  - Collection of pictures, videos and audio files

Individual evidence

  1. The ICTY renders its final judgment in the Prlić et al. appeal case
  2. "SECURITY COUNCIL APPOINTS SERGE BRAMMERTZ, FORMER LEAD INVESTIGATOR OF LEBANESE PRIME MINISTER'S DEATH, TO HEAD INTERNATIONAL TRIBUNAL FOR FORMER YUGOSLAVIA" , UN Security Council Resolution 1786 , November 28, 2007
  3. Caroline Fetscher: The Yugoslavia Tribunal - a balance sheet . In: Der Tagesspiegel , November 29, 2017.
  4. ICTY annual report 2007. (PDF; 198 kB) pp. 23-25. ICTY annual report 2006. (PDF; 222 kB) p. 24. ICTY annual report 2005. (PDF; 405 kB) p. 47, 61. Page with all ICTY annual reports since 1994
  5. ^ The Cost of Justice (ICTY budget and staff) , Retrieved May 3, 2015.
  6. The Duško Tadić case.Retrieved May 3, 2015.
  7. ^ Enforcement of Sentences , Retrieved May 3, 2015.
  8. ICTY Facts & Figures. (PDF; 696 kB) In: icty.org. November 2017. Retrieved November 29, 2017 .
  9. Official indictment statistics of the Tribunal ( Memento of January 26, 2009 in the Internet Archive )
  10. Acquittal for UÇK commanders Haradinaj, Balaj and Brahimaj (PDF; 159 kB)
  11. Entry on the ICTY website
  12. ^ Case Information Sheet
  13. Report of the tribunal on its termination (PDF; 334 kB)
  14. Bosnia to expel Serbian professor . ( Memento of June 7, 2011 in the Internet Archive ) B92 , June 4, 2008
  15. a b c Kosta Čavoški: The Hague against Justice ( Memento of November 4, 2011 in the Internet Archive ), Center for Serbian Studies, Belgrade 1996
  16. Jonathan Widell, Patrick Barriot, Jacques Vergès: Moscow Calling. Why Milošević was never trated in Russia? serbianna.com, August 25, 2006
  17. Konstantinos D. Magliveras: The Interplay Between the Transfer of Slobodan Milosevic to the ICTY and Yugoslav Constitutional Law . (PDF; 56 kB) In: EJIL , 2002, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 661-677.
  18. ^ Sense and abuse of international jurisdiction. AG Peace Research at the University of Kassel
  19. Paolo Benvenuti: The ICTY Prosecutor and the Review of the NATO Bombing Campaign against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (PDF; 164 kB), EJIL (2001) Vol. 12, No. 3, pp. 503-529
  20. Avner Gidron, Claudio Cordone: Faut-il juger l'OTAN? Le Monde Diplomatique , July 2000
  21. European Court of Human Rights, Decision as to the Admissibility of Application no. 51891/99 by Mladen Naletilić against Croatia, May 4, 2000

Coordinates: 52 ° 5 ′ 40 ″  N , 4 ° 17 ′ 4 ″  E