German euro coins


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The German euro coins are in Germany put into circulation Euro coins of the common European currency Euro . On January 1, 1999, Germany joined the Eurozone , which made the introduction of the Euro valid as the future payment method. The first coins were given to the public in “starter kits” on December 17, 2001, and retailers and banks were able to receive them earlier as part of what is known as “frontloading”. Like all other euro coins and notes, they became valid as a means of payment on January 1, 2002.

Circulation coins

The circulation coins have their own national motif for each of the three coin rows. The smallest row of the 1, 2 and 5 cent coins was designed by Rolf Lederbogen and features oak leaves . The middle row with the 10, 20 and 50 cent coins shows the Brandenburg Gate and was designed by Reinhart Heinsdorff . The design of the two largest coins comes from Heinz Hoyer and Sneschana Russewa-Hoyer and depicts the federal eagle . The design of the 1, 2 and 5 cent as well as the 1 and 2 euro coins is reminiscent of the motifs of the old DM coins .

In contrast to the other euro countries, German coins are produced in five different mints. These are marked on the coins by a letter near the year. The following table lists all German mints and their respective proportions in the total circulation of the German euro coins .

German euro coins (Germany)
A Berlin
A Berlin
D Munich
D Munich
F Stuttgart
F Stuttgart
G Karlsruhe
G Karlsruhe
J Hamburg
J Hamburg
Mints of the German euro coins
Merkhilfe: alphabetically clockwise, starting in the capital
character Embossing time * Mint proportion of
from to
A. 1999 today State Mint Berlin 20%
D. 1998 today Bavarian Main Mint (Munich) 21%
F. 1999 today State Mint Stuttgart 24%
G 1998 today State Mint Karlsruhe 14%
J 1998 today Hamburg Mint 21%
* Unlike in some other euro countries,
the coins minted before 2002 bear the year of issue "2002".

There was a serious mistake in the early days of euro coin production. The stars on the first coins were not oriented upwards, as on the European flag , but rather radially. After this was noticed, the coins produced up to then were destroyed again. A few copies, however, came into circulation. These so-called rotating stars are sought after by collectors.

Like most of the euro countries, Germany has been minting its euro coins with the newly designed front since 2007 (new map of Europe).

Due to the mixing of the national euro coins, the proportion of German euro coins in Germany has slowly but steadily decreased since the introduction of the euro. According to the surveys of the Dutch website Eurodiffusie.nl , the proportion of German euro coins in the Federal Republic of Germany was just under 86% in 2006, and in 2009 it had fallen further to around 80%.

Oak leaves

The oak leaf is a symbol with history: In the German Confederation from 1815, all its members still had customs and coinage sovereignty . The German Customs Union and the Münzeinigung went hand in hand. Using the symbolic power of the oak tree as a symbol of the common Germanness for German coins goes back to the Munich Mint Treaty of 1837. This agreement made Germany a unified economic area. For the smallest of the German euro coins, the oak leaf was chosen as a familiar symbol, which also adorned the German pfennig . The motif comes from a design by Professor Rolf Lederbogen from Karlsruhe . The coin image of the 2-cent coin of the mint "G" (Karlsruhe) was reduced in size in 2016, and in 2017 the other mints followed. Since 2018, the 1 and 5 cent coins have also been minted with the reduced coin image.

Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate , a conspicuous structure built in the classical style by Carl Gotthard Langhans and crowned with a quadriga , is a landmark of the German capital Berlin . This building reflects German history. In the German Reich it was used for parades. After the Second World War , the Brandenburg Gate became a symbol of the division of Germany . When the Berlin Wall came down in November 1989 , Germans from East and West met at the Brandenburg Gate. Since then, the opened Brandenburg Gate has stood for a united Germany and is also a symbol for the European unification process. The Brandenburg Gate has been used repeatedly as a motif on German coins since the 1930s.

In the original Quadriga, the two horses in the middle lift their inner legs, but on the design by the artist Reinhart Heinsdorff , their outer legs . The first edition with rotating stars corresponds to the design in this detail, whereas the coins actually issued are the original. The 10 and 20 cent coins according to Heinsdorff's design have only been minted since 2007.

Federal eagle

The federal eagle has been the national coat of arms of the Federal Republic of Germany since 1950. The coat of arms of the Weimar Republic from 1919 was adopted in an almost identical form . The eagle was also the coat of arms of the German Empire from 1871. The federal eagle can be found in numerous surroundings today. It hangs in the plenary hall of the German Bundestag . It can be found in German passports and ID cards as a graphic symbol and as an official stamp. The design comes from Sneschana Russewa-Hoyer and Heinz Hoyer from Berlin.

All designs contain the twelve stars of the EU, the year of issue and a letter that denotes the mint (see table).

Images of the German euro coins | National side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
1 cent Germany 2 cents Germany 5 cents Germany
Branch of a German oak , similar to the earlier Pfennig .
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
10 cents Germany 20 cents Germany 50 Cent Germany
The Brandenburg Gate as a symbol of division and unity.
1.00 € € 2.00 Edge of the € 2 coin
1 euro Germany 2 euros Germany Edge of the 2 euro coin
The German federal eagle , symbol of German sovereignty. " UNITY AND RIGHT
AND FREEDOM
Federal eagle "

Design guidelines from 2008

Most of the German euro coins do not fully comply with the design guidelines of the European Commission. These contain recommendations for the design of the national sides of the course coins. Among other things, the full or abbreviated name of the issuing country should be indicated on the national page. This is especially not observed by the German course coins. Only the mint is indicated there. Furthermore, the European stars should be arranged like on the European flag - in particular, be evenly distributed in a circle. This is not the case with the coins of the federal state series up to and including 2009. This explains the design difference between the first four and the rest of the coins in the Bundesländer series . The countries whose coins do not yet comply with the recommendations described above can make the necessary adjustments at any time; they must do this by June 20, 2062 at the latest.

2 euro commemorative coins

In 2006, Germany began to issue 2 euro commemorative coins , each dedicated to the federal state holding the Federal Council Presidency at the beginning of the year of issue . A well-known building from the respective federal state is depicted on the coins of the federal states series . The sequence of the presidencies of the Federal Council was changed from the 2017/18 financial year onwards due to the changed population figures. Schleswig-Holstein, to which the first commemorative coin was dedicated in 2006, took over the chairmanship on November 1, 2018 for 12 months - therefore the series was suspended for one year in 2019. A commemorative coin will be minted for each federal state by 2022.

No. image Issue date
image reference
occasion Official Journal
reference
Edition
1 € 2 commemorative coin Germany 2006.png February 3, 2006
Schleswig-Holstein ( Holstentor in Lübeck )
1st coin of the federal series

31,500,630
2 2 Euro commemorative coin 2007 Germany.jpg February 2, 2007
Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania ( Schwerin Castle )
2nd coin of the federal series

31.245.630
3 2 € Germany 2007 Treaty of Rome.jpg March 25, 2007
50th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome,
Euro-13 joint edition

30,865,630
4th Germany2008Hamburg.jpg February 1, 2008
Hamburg ( St. Michaelis Church )
3rd coin of the federal series

30,513,630
5 2 Euro Germany 2009 WWU.jpg January 2, 2009
10th anniversary of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU)
Euro 16 joint edition

30,565,630
6th Germany2009Saarland.jpg February 6, 2009
Saarland ( Ludwigskirche in Saarbrücken )
4th coin of the federal series

30,940,630
7th 2 Euro commemorative coin 2010 Germany.jpg January 29, 2010
Bremen ( Bremen town hall and Roland statue )
5th coin of the federal series

30,925,630
8th Germany2011NRW.jpg January 28, 2011
North Rhine-Westphalia ( Cologne Cathedral )
6th coin of the federal series

30,925,000
9 Euro cash Germany 2012.jpg January 2, 2012
10th anniversary of the introduction of euro cash
Euro 17 joint issue

30,648,000
10 Germany2012Bayern.jpg 3rd February 2012
Bavaria ( Neuschwanstein Castle )
7th coin in the federal series

30,883,000
11 2 Euro Germany 2013 Élysée Treaty.jpg January 22, 2013
50 years of the Élysée Treaty
Joint edition of Germany and France

11,585,000
12 2 Euro Germany 2013 Maulbronn Monastery.jpg 1st February 2013
Baden-Württemberg ( Maulbronn Monastery with fountain)
8th coin of the federal series

30,845,000
13 € 2 Lower Saxony Germany 2014.jpg February 6, 2014
Lower Saxony ( St. Michael in Hildesheim )
9th coin of the federal series

30,799,300
14th Germany2015Hessen.jpg January 30, 2015
Hessen ( Frankfurter Paulskirche )
10th coin of the federal series

30.767.100
15th Germany2015DeutscheUnit.jpg January 30, 2015
25 years of German unity
30.517.100
16 Germany2015EU-Flag.jpg 5th November 2015
30th anniversary of the EU flag
Euro-19 joint issue

30,125,000
17th Germany 2016 Saxony.jpg 5th February 2016
Saxony ( Zwinger in Dresden )
11th coin of the federal series

30,677,600
18th 2 Euro D RhPf 2017.jpg 3rd February 2017
Rhineland-Palatinate ( Porta Nigra in Trier )
12th coin of the federal series

30,616,300
19th 2EUR Berlin 2018.jpg January 30, 2018
Berlin ( Charlottenburg Palace )
13th coin of the federal series

30,581,900
20th 2-Euro-Helmut-Schmidt-2018.png January 30, 2018
100th birthday of Helmut Schmidt
20,571,900
21st 2Euro D Federal Council 2019.png 29 January 2019
70 years of the Bundesrat ( Prussian mansion in Berlin )
14th coin of the federal series

30,532,900
22nd 2 Euro D 30 Wall Fall 2019.jpg October 10, 2019
30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall
Joint edition of Germany and France

30,339,400
23 2EUR D Brandenburg.jpg January 28, 2020
Brandenburg ( Sanssouci Palace, Potsdam )
15th coin of the federal series

30,000,000
24 October 8, 2020
50 years of Warsaw kneeling down
25th January 26, 2021
Saxony-Anhalt ( Magdeburg Cathedral )
16th coin of the federal series
26th 2022
Thuringia ( Wartburg )
17th coin of the federal series
27 2022 35 years of the Erasmus program
Euro 19 joint edition

Collector coins

Since 2002, 10 euro commemorative silver coins have also been minted annually in the various mints . These remind of certain people, events or sights. A special feature are the commemorative coins on the occasion of various sporting events (e.g. soccer World Cup 2006 ). These coins were produced in equal proportions in all five German mints. They do not have an embossed letter, but can only be assigned to their mint through minimal differences. From 2011, the weight and the precious metal content were reduced due to the increased silver price , and the coins (with the exception of the first 2011 coin) are also minted in a copper-nickel alloy. As of 2016, the 10 euro commemorative coins were replaced by those with a face value of 20 euros.

In addition, a 100 euro gold coin is issued each year. In 2002, the introduction of the euro was honored with the 10 euro coin made of 925 silver and the 100 euro gold coin with a 200 euro gold coin. At the beginning of 2010, the Federal Ministry of Finance in Berlin announced that from June 2010 another annual gold coin with a face value of EUR 20 will be released for a period of 6 years. While the 100-euro gold coins are made from half an ounce of fine gold (the 200-euro coin from one ounce in 2002), the 20-euro coins are made from 1/8 ounce of fine gold. The 100 euro coins currently honor the Unesco world cultural sites in Germany. The 20 euro coins are dedicated to the topic of the “German forest”. From 2016 the series “German Forest” was continued with “Domestic Birds”. In addition, in 2017, on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, a gold coin with a face value of 50 euros was issued for the first time; from 2018 a series with the same face value will follow under the title "Musical Instruments".

A 5 euro commemorative coin has been issued annually since 2016. The coins are made up of three components: an outer ring, the inner core and an intermediate colored polymer ring that is partially translucent. A copper-nickel alloy is used as the metal. The weight is 9.0 grams and the diameter is 27.25 mm.

See also

Web links

Commons : German Euro Coins  - Collection of images, videos and audio files

Individual evidence

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