International peace trip


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Logo of the 30th International Peace Tour
Logo for the peace trip 1987

The Internationale Friedensfahrt also international long-distance journey for peace ( Polish Wyścig Pokoju as well as Czech. Závod Míru or internationally customary French Course de la Paix ) was a stage race in Central Europe and, until the political upheaval in the former Eastern Bloc states in 1989, the most important amateur bicycle race internationally . With a few exceptions, Berlin , Prague and Warsaw were alternately starting, stage or destination locations every year. The last race so far was held in 2006 through Germany , Austria and the Czech Republic , after it was not included in the then new UCI Protour in 2005 and had not taken place for the first time since the first edition due to financial and organizational problems.

A new edition of the race was planned for 2014 from May 1st to May 6th. The peace ride was classified under category 2.2 in the UCI's international racing calendar , but the plan was abandoned by the organizer, former Czechoslovak racing driver Jozef Regec . Instead, four one-day races were registered in the UCI Europe Tour 2014 racing calendar .

history

Poster of the Peace Trip 1955
2nd stage of the Friedensfahrt 1960 , May 5th: The two first place winners received a Czechoslovak moped type Jawa 555 “Pionyr” and a Polish moped type Komar 230 (in German “Mücke”). Left: Täve Schur , Pl. 2, GDR, right: Albert Coven, Belgium, Pl. 1

The idea for the race had independently the sportswriter en Karel TOCL from Prague and Zygmunt Weiss from Warsaw in 1947. Both wanted to organize a stage race between the two cities and both wanted their city should aim tour. This conflict gave rise to the idea of ​​holding two races in parallel in 1948. The peace voyage was first held in 1948 and initially took place between Warsaw and Prague . The organizers were the daily newspapers Rudé právo from Prague and Trybuna Ludu from Warsaw. From 1952 the race was also taken to East Berlin and then connected the capitals of the three participating countries Poland , Czechoslovakia and GDR in alternating routes in May . The daily newspaper Neues Deutschland was the organizer for the GDR . The official symbol for the peace journey was Pablo Picasso's white dove of peace .

Because of the political situation in Czechoslovakia , the 1969 Peace Tour was only held in Poland and the GDR. The first German stage winner was Bernhard Trefflich from the GDR team on May 9, 1953, on the 8th stage from Berlin to Görlitz .

The future road cycling world champion Täve Schur became the first overall winner for the GDR in 1955. A year later, a team from West Germany competed for the first time . The future national coach Peter Weibel won the first stage for the Federal Republic in 1976.

Until the fall of the Berlin Wall and the peaceful revolution in 1989, the Peace Tour was known as the “ Tour de France of the East” and was as popular there as it was in Western Europe. The peace voyage was largely dominated by the state amateurs of the Central and Eastern European countries. The also participating Western European national teams could only start with young drivers who did not have professional status.

The 1986 peace drive started in Kiev. The city is only 100 kilometers from the nuclear power plant in Pripyat , where shortly before Chernobyl nuclear disaster had occurred, removed. Out of 19 registered teams, 9, including almost all registered western teams, canceled their participation. GDR athletes, including the eventual winner Olaf Ludwig, were forced to take part.

The year 1989 represented a decisive turning point for the tour. The amateur status lost its importance within a very short time and was finally abolished entirely. The peace drive got into crisis. In the mid-1990s it was transformed into a professional race and had established itself in the calendar of the UCI World Cycling Federation as a middle category 2.2 race. It continued through the classic participating countries Poland , the Czech Republic or Slovakia and Germany , but only rarely touched their capitals.

The most successful participant is Steffen Wesemann , who won the Peace Trip five times between 1992 and 2003. Uwe Ampler each achieved four successes (three times for the GDR, once for the Polish team "Mroz") and the Pole Ryszard Szurkowski . The two-time winner Gustav-Adolf Schur , called "Täve", was elected by far the most popular athlete in the GDR after 1989.

The Czech Cycling Federation has had the rights to the name "Course de la Paix" since 2004, which means that it is also primarily responsible for running the race. With the non-inclusion of the race in the newly created highest cycling class UCI ProTour 2005, the position of the event deteriorated. Financial and organizational problems - in particular the separation between the main Czech organizer, Pavel Doležel, and his German marketing partners and the resulting loss of important German sponsors - led in spring 2005 to the fact that the peace trip was initially postponed and finally canceled. The race was resumed in 2006 with a total of eight stages, which were held on the territories of Austria (start), the Czech Republic and Germany (finish) from May 13th to 20th. For the first time Austria was the host country.

The 59th edition of the Peace Tour in 2007 was canceled. The main reason was the withdrawal of the main sponsor Škoda Auto , who initially secured funding of 500,000 euros, but withdrew it in November 2006. The Czech association then announced that it had not found a new partner. Since then there has been no peace trip.

Ratings

Since its debut in 1948 , the yellow jersey for the leading driver in the overall individual classification and the blue jersey for the best team have been awarded at the International Peace Tour. Over time, more categories were introduced, represented by different jerseys. The prerequisite for overall victory in each of these ratings was completing the entire tour in accordance with the regulations. If a driver was in the lead in several ratings at the same time, the following ranking applied to the jersey selection:

  1. Overall rating - individual
  2. Most versatile driver
  3. Most active driver / best sprinter
  4. Best climber
  5. Best point driver

Overall rating - individual

Yellow jersey
from 1948

The criterion for the overall individual ranking is the sum of all times from the individual stages and the prologue (except for the team time trial), with the driver with the lowest overall time leading the ranking. In the event of a tie, the lower total of the placements in the stages completed so far is decisive (until 1986 identical to the ranking of the driver with the best points ). If there is no difference here either, the larger number of better places - compared to first place - is decisive. If there is a tie here, too, the better placement on the last completed stage decides.

The total time is made up of the following components:

  • the sum of the driving times measured on the stages (except team time trials)
  • Until 1981 five, three and one second (s) credit for a podium position per stage (except prologue and team time trials)
  • from 1982 ten, six and three seconds credit for a podium position per stage (except prologue and team time trial)
  • in the final ten, six and three seconds credit for the top three of the final ratings Aktivster driver , Best climber and point best driver
  • If necessary, additional penalty time due to improper behavior (usually imposed if other drivers or spectators are at risk)

Steffen Wesemann (Germany) wore the yellow jersey a total of five times at the end of the tour, making him the sole record holder. With 49 stages, the four-time overall winner Ryszard Szurkowski (POL) had the yellow jersey for the longest time.

Overall ranking - team

Maillot unidentified.png
No jerseys were awarded

1948–1950
Jersey white.svg
White jersey

1951
Jersey blue.svg
Blue shirt

1952–1989
Jersey blue.svg
Blue jersey
only symbolically
from 1990

The category of the best team has existed from the start. If there were no jerseys at the beginning, the winners were given white jerseys in 1951. For the next 38 years, the color blue marked the leading team in the team classification. Since 1990, the jerseys have only been given symbolically to the winning team at the end of every Peace Tour.

The criterion is the sum of the stage team times, with the team with the lowest total time leading the ranking. In the event of a tie, the lower sum of the places of the top three drivers in the overall individual ranking decides for the teams concerned. If there is no difference here either, the best placed driver of all the teams concerned in the overall individual ranking will be decisive.

The total time is made up of the following components:

  • the sum of the driving times measured on the individual stages including the prologue (without time credits) of the top three drivers of each team
  • the time achieved in the team time trial, measured against the fourth driver

With a total of 20 overall successes, the selection of the USSR is the undisputed record winner in this category, which also held the top position for the longest with 218 stages. Since the approval of professional racing teams in 1996, the T-Mobile team has been able to triumph most often with a total of four overall wins.

Best climber (from 1956)

Maillot unidentified.png
No jerseys were awarded
1956–1968
Jersey pink.svg
Pink jersey
1969-1971
Jersey green.svg
Green jersey
1972-1997
Jersey polkadot.svg
Dotted jersey
from 1998

The rating for the best mountain rider was introduced in 1956, initially without a jersey. From 1969, the best placed in this category was awarded the pink jersey. From 1972 the jersey color was changed to green and kept for the next 25 years. With the change of categories and the introduction of the green jersey for the best sprinter in 1998, the dotted jersey will be awarded to the best climber from now on .

The criterion for this category is the sum of all points from mountain ratings, with the driver with the highest number of points leading the rating. In the event of a tie, the better placement in the overall individual ranking is decisive.

The awarding of points consists of the following components:

  • seven, five, three, two and one point (s) for the top five for climbs of category I (elevations of at least 5 km in length and a difference in altitude of at least 250 m)
  • five, three and one point (s) for the first three places on climbs of category II (elevations with less than 250 m difference in altitude)

At the end of the tour, three drivers were able to secure three wins in the Best Mountain Driver category . Sergei Suchorutschenkow (URS) set the record in 1984, which was then equalized by Uwe Ampler (GDR) and Jaroslav Bílek (ČSSR). With 21 stages, Ryszard Szurkowski (POL) and Uwe Ampler were most often in the top position in the mountain classification.

Most active driver / best sprinter (from 1962)

Jersey violet.svg
Purple jersey
Most active driver
1962–1997
Jersey green.svg
Green jersey
Best Sprinter
from 1998


The rating for the most active driver was introduced in 1962 and represented by the purple jersey. With the change in 1998, the category was changed to Best Sprinter and the jersey color to green.

The criterion is the sum of all points from premium spurts and advances, the driver with the highest number of points leading the ranking. In the event of a tie, the better placement in the overall individual ranking is decisive.

The awarding of points consists of the following components:

  • three, two and one point (s) for the top three in premium sprints
  • three points for each outlier or each participant in a group of up to ten drivers with a lead of at least 1:30 minutes ahead of the next-placed driver. An additional point is awarded for every further half a minute that has been started

The record winner in this category is Olaf Ludwig , who, starting exclusively for the GDR, was able to call the most active driver's violet jersey his own at the end of eight tours . With 55 stages, the native of Gera had the jersey for the longest time.

Best young driver (from 1989)

Jersey unknown.svg
black and white striped jersey
1989
Jersey white.svg
White jersey

from 1990


The rating for the best young driver was introduced in 1989. While a black and white striped jersey was donated in the first year, the leader in this ranking will receive the white jersey from 1990 onwards. The criterion for this category was the placement of drivers under the age of 21 in the overall individual ranking. In 1998 the age limit was raised to 23 years, since 2003 the maximum age is 25 years.

Torsten Hiekmann (Germany) wore the jersey of the best young rider with ten stages the longest.

Best driver on points (1978–1997)

Jersey white.svg
White shirt
1978–1989
Jersey polkadot.svg
Dotted jersey
1990–1997


The ranking for the driver with the best points was introduced in 1978 and was represented by the white jersey until 1989. From 1990, the leader of this category wore a white jersey with red dots, as the previous jersey was from now on reserved for the best young drivers. In 1998 the category of the driver with the best points was abolished and the dotted jersey was transferred to the ranking of the best mountain driver .

The criterion was the sum of all points from the individual stage ratings. Until 1986 the points corresponded to the respective stage position, the driver with the lowest number of points led the ranking. From 1987 onwards, the awarding of points was adapted to the regulations of the International Amateur Cycling Federation ( FIAC) , so that from then on the rider with the highest number of points led the ranking. In the event of a tie, the better placement in the overall individual ranking was decided.

The awarding of points consisted of the following components:

  • 25, 20, 16, 14, 12 points for the top five in a stage with a mass start, from sixth to 15th place ten to one point (s) were awarded
  • ten to one point (s) for the ten first placed in the prologue or individual time trial

The record winner in this category is Olaf Ludwig , who, starting exclusively for the GDR, was able to win the final ranking for the driver with the best points six times . With 47 stages, Ludwig had the jersey in his possession the longest.

Most versatile driver (1980–1995)

Pink shirt
1980-1995

The pink jersey for the most versatile driver was awarded from 1980 to 1995. The criterion was the point total of the three categories of the most active rider , the best mountain rider and the most points the driver , the driver with the highest score led it to the vote. In the event of a tie, the better placement in the overall individual ranking was decided.

The awarding of points consisted of the following components:

  • the sum of all points from premium spurts and advances
  • the sum of all points from mountain ratings
  • ten to one point (s) for the top ten finishers in each stage (except for team time trials)

The record winner in this category is Olaf Ludwig , who, starting exclusively for the GDR, was able to win the final ranking of the most versatile driver eight times . With 75 stages, Ludwig had the jersey in his possession the longest.

Peace Drive Fanfare

In the early 1950s, the GDR radio was looking for a suitable fanfare for reporting on the Friedensfahrt and chose the radio production by the composer Paul Noack-Ihlenfeld . The fanfare was played at the beginning of the radio broadcast as well as at all award ceremonies and soon established itself as the distinctive melody of the Peace Tour. Later it became a general symbol of cycling in the GDR and was an essential part of mass sports movements (“ Little Peace Ride ”, “ Child and Youth Partakiade ”). The peace drive fanfare was also associated with the successes of the multiple peace drive winner and sports idol Täve Schur and was probably the best known and most popular fanfare in the GDR.

Course de la Paix cycling museum

Stylization of the Little Peace Tour on an Olympia stamp of the GDR from 1976

In the municipality of Kleinmühlingen near Calbe (Saale) is the only Peace Museum, the Course de la Paix cycling museum . The initiator of this facility is Horst Schäfer. The foundation stone for the new museum was laid on May 21, 2005, as the rooms in which it was housed no longer offered enough space for the many exhibits. The sponsoring association is supported by former cycling greats, including Täve Schur and, until his death, also by Klaus Ampler. On November 24, 2007, the Friedensfahrt Museum opened its doors to the public.

The overall winner from 1948 to 1961

winner

Amateurs / elite

1977
1987
1987: Start of the 156 drivers for the 40th Peace Tour in Berlin
2006: Start of the 6th stage of the 58th Peace Tour in Dippoldiswalde

In a few years short prologue and epilogue stages were carried out (P and E, Stages column )

No. year route length Stages Individual winner Team winner
P Number E.
01 1948 Warsaw - Prague 1104 km 07th Yugoslavia Socialist Federal RepublicYugoslavia August Prosenik PolandPoland Poland
1948 Prague – Warsaw 0842 km 05 Yugoslavia Socialist Federal RepublicYugoslavia Aleksandar Zorić PolandPoland Poland
02 1949 Prague – Warsaw 1259 km 08th CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Jan Veselý France 1946Fourth French Republic France 2
03 1950 Warsaw – Prague 1539 km 09 DenmarkDenmark Willy Emborg CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
04th 1951 Prague – Warsaw 1544 km 09 DenmarkDenmark Kaj Allan Olsen CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
05 1952 Warsaw - Berlin - Prague 2135 km 12 United KingdomUnited Kingdom Ian Steel United KingdomUnited Kingdom United Kingdom
06th 1953 Bratislava – Berlin – Warsaw 2231 km 12 DenmarkDenmark Christian Pedersen Germany Democratic Republic 1949German Democratic Republic GDR
07th 1954 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2051 km 13 DenmarkDenmark Eluf Dalgaard CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
08th 1955 Prague – Berlin – Warsaw 2214 km 13 Germany Democratic Republic 1949German Democratic Republic Gustav-Adolf Schur CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
09 1956 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2212 km 12 PolandPoland Stanislaw Królak Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
10 1957 Prague – Berlin – Warsaw 2220 km 12 Bulgaria 1948Bulgaria Nentscho Christow Germany Democratic Republic 1949German Democratic Republic GDR
11 1958 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2210 km 12 NetherlandsNetherlands Piet ladies Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
12 1959 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 2057 km 13 Germany Democratic Republic 1949German Democratic Republic Gustav-Adolf Schur Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
13 1960 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 2290 km 13 Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Erich Hagen Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
14th 1961 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2435 km 13 Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Yuri Melichow Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
15th 1962 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 2407 km 14th Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Gainan Saidchushin Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
16 1963 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 2568 km 15th Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Klaus Ampler Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
17th 1964 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2246 km 14th CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Jan Smolík Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
18th 1965 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 2318 km 15th Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Gennady Lebedev Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
19th 1966 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 2340 km 15th FranceFrance Bernard Guyot Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
20th 1967 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2307 km 16 BelgiumBelgium Marcel Maes PolandPoland Poland
21st 1968 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 2352 km 14th Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Axel Peschel PolandPoland Poland
22nd 1969 Warsaw – Berlin 2036 km 15th FranceFrance Jean-Pierre Danguillaume Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
23 1970 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 1976 km 15th PolandPoland Ryszard Szurkowski PolandPoland Poland
24 1971 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 1895 km 14th PolandPoland Ryszard Szurkowski Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
25th 1972 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 2025 km 14th CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Vlastimil Moravec Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
26th 1973 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 2076 km P 16 E. PolandPoland Ryszard Szurkowski PolandPoland Poland
27 1974 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 1806 km 14th PolandPoland Stanislaw Szozda PolandPoland Poland
28 1975 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 1915 km P 13 PolandPoland Ryszard Szurkowski Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
29 1976 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 1974 km P 14th Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Hans-Joachim Hartnick Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
30th 1977 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 1648 km 13 Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Aavo Pikkuus Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
31 1978 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 1796 km P 12 Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Alexander Awerin Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
32 1979 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 1942 km P 14th Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Sergei Sukhoruchenkov Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
33 1980 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 2095 km P 14th Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union Yuri Barinov Soviet Union 1955Soviet Union USSR
34 1981 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 1887 km P 14th Soviet UnionSoviet Union Shachid Sagretdinov Soviet UnionSoviet Union USSR
35 1982 Prague – Warsaw – Berlin 1941 km P 12 Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Olaf Ludwig Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
36 1983 Warsaw – Berlin – Prague 1899 km P 12 Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Falk Boden Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
37 1984 Berlin – Prague – Warsaw 1689 km P 11 Soviet UnionSoviet Union Sergei Sukhoruchenkov Soviet UnionSoviet Union USSR
38 1985 Prague - Moscow - Warsaw - Berlin 1712 km P 12 PolandPoland Lech Piasecki Soviet UnionSoviet Union USSR
39 1986 Kiev - Warsaw - Berlin - Prague 2138 km P 15th Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Olaf Ludwig Soviet UnionSoviet Union USSR
40 1987 Berlin - Prague - Warsaw 1987 km P 14th Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Uwe Ampler Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
41 1988 Bratislava - Katowice - Berlin 2008 km P 13 Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Uwe Ampler Soviet UnionSoviet Union USSR
42 1989 Warsaw - Berlin - Prague 1927 km 12 Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR Uwe Ampler Germany Democratic Republic 1949GDR GDR
43 1990 Berlin - Slušovice - Bielsko-Biała 1595 km P 11 CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Ján Svorada CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
44 1991 Prague - Warsaw 1261 km P 09 Soviet UnionSoviet Union Viktor Ryaksinsky PolandPoland Poland
45 1992 Berlin - Karpacz - Mladá Boleslav 1348 km P 09 GermanyGermany Steffen Wesemann GermanyGermany Germany
46 1993 Tábor - Nový Bor 1342 km P 09 Czech RepublicCzech Republic Jaroslav Bílek Czech RepublicCzech Republic Czech Republic
47 1994 Tábor - Trutnov 1354 km P 09 GermanyGermany Jens Voigt Czech RepublicCzech Republic Czech Republic
48 1995 České Budějovice - Oberwiesenthal - Brno 1379 km P 10 Czech RepublicCzech Republic Pavel Padrnos PolandPoland Poland
49 1996 Brno - Żywiec - Leipzig 1703 km P 10 GermanyGermany Steffen Wesemann GermanyGermany Team Telekom
50 1997 Potsdam - Żywiec - Brno 1629 km P 10 GermanyGermany Steffen Wesemann GermanyGermany Team Telekom
51 1998 Poznań - Karlovy Vary - Erfurt 1591 km 10 GermanyGermany Uwe Ampler PolandPoland Mróz
52 1999 Znojmo - Polkowice - Magdeburg 1613 km 10 GermanyGermany Steffen Wesemann PolandPoland Mróz
53 2000 Hanover - Kudowa-Zdrój - Prague 1608 km 10 PolandPoland Piotr Wadecki GermanyGermany Team Nürnberger
54 2001 Łódź - Plzeň - Potsdam 1611 km 10 DenmarkDenmark Jacob Piil GermanyGermany Team Telekom
55 2002 České Budějovice - Chemnitz - Warsaw 1470 km 10 Czech RepublicCzech Republic Ondřej Sosenka PolandPoland Mróz
56 2003 Olomouc - Wałbrzych - Erfurt 1552 km 09 GermanyGermany Steffen Wesemann PolandPoland CCC Polsat
57 2004 Brussels - Wrocław - Prague 1580 km 09 ItalyItaly Michele Scarponi GermanyGermany T-Mobile team
58 2006 Linz - Karlovy Vary - Hanover 1296 km 08th ItalyItaly Giampaolo Cheula SwedenSweden Unibet.com

U23

The U23 event ran until 2016 under the name Course de la Paix U23 / Závod Míru U23 . The event has been running under Grand Prix Priessnitz spa since 2017 .

Juniors

The junior competition runs under the name Course de la Paix Junior .

literature

  • Klaus Huhn : The History of the Peace Tour. 2001, ISBN 3-933544-52-1 .
  • Cobblestones and asphalt. Radio feature of the MDR . 1 CD. Pool Music and Media, 1998, 4260031180232.
  • The story of the peace journey. Sportverlag, Berlin 1954, anthology (director: Brigitte Roszak)
  • Hagen Boßdorf: History of the Peace Journey. VHS video. 1997, ISBN 3-328-00770-9 .
  • Täve Schur (Ed.): Friedensfahrt. Spotless-Verlag, 1995, ISBN 3-928999-47-8 .
  • Manfred Hönel: 100 Highlights Peace Tour. 1997, ISBN 3-328-00717-2 .
  • Klaus Huhn: Every time in May. 1987, ISBN 3-328-00177-8 .
  • Tilo Köhler: The favorite drove Kowalit: Täve Schur and the peace trip. 1997, ISBN 3-378-01015-0 .
  • Adolf Klimanschewsky: Warsaw, Berlin, Prague. An experience report from the Peace Trip in 1952. Sportverlag, Berlin 1953.
  • Author collective: Friedensfahrt . Sportverlag, Berlin, 1962.
  • Back then in the GDR. 3 CDs, 2001, BMG 743218855023 (including the Friedensfahrt fanfare).
  • Rainer Sprehe: Everything rower? A Wessi on a peace journey. Covadonga, Bielefeld 2012, ISBN 978-3-936973-70-9 .
  • Herbert Kronfeld: Between start and finish. Sportverlag, Berlin, 1957.
  • Horst Schubert: Whispering stages. Sports publishing house, Berlin, 1956.
  • Horst Schubert and a .: Every year in May. Sportverlag, Berlin, 1957.
  • VII. International Peace Tour . Folk Art Publishing House Reichenbach, 1955.
  • Egon Lemke: giants of the pedals. Young World Publishing House, Berlin, 1958 .
  • Klaus Ullrich: Smart minds - quick legs. Sportverlag, Berlin, 1963.
  • Andreas Ciesielski: The miracle of Warsaw , Scheunen-Verlag, Kückenshagen, 2005, ISBN 3-934301-83-5 .

Web links

Commons : Friedensfahrt  - Collection of pictures, videos and audio files

statistics

Individual evidence

  1. Wolfgang Brylla: The peace journey is back. January 16, 2014, accessed January 16, 2014 .
  2. radsport-news.com from March 8, 2014: Peace ride will not be revived
  3. Manfred Hönel, Olaf Ludwig: 100 Highlights Peace Trip . Sportverlag, Berlin 1997, ISBN 3-328-00717-2 , p. 7 .
  4. Maik Märtin: 50 years of Course de la Paix . Agency Construct, Leipzig 1998, p. 71 .
  5. Klaus Schroeder : The SED state. History and structures of the GDR 1949–1990. completely revised and greatly expanded new edition. Böhlau, Vienna / Cologne / Weimar 2013, ISBN 978-3-412-21109-7 , p. 673.